Acta Entomology and Zoology
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P-ISSN: 2708-0013, E-ISSN: 2708-0021

Acta Entomology and Zoology

2021, Vol. 2, Issue 1, Part B
Incorporating lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus L.) and marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) as non-host barrier plants to reduce impact of flea beetle (Chaetocnema confinis C.) in cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.)


Author(s): Kari Iamba and Tonavu Yaubi

Abstract: The repelling of insect pests and attracting of beneficial insects using non-host plants is an important component of ‘push-pull’ strategy. Plants with insecticidal properties are locally abundant and can be utilized to management insect pests. For this study, Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus L.) and Marigold plant (Tagetes erecta L.) were intercropped with cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) as border plants to reduce the population dynamics of flea beetle (Chaetocnema confinis C.). Lemon grass was selected based on its repellent properties while marigold for its pull mechanism. Both lemon grass and marigold were planted as barrier or border plants to cabbage. Lemon grass (C. citratus) was effective in minimizing the abundance of C. confinis, reduced defoliation (%) and enhanced leaf area of cabbage plants (p<0.05). Marigold (T. erecta) was effective in reducing the defoliation (p<0.05) however it did not reduce the population of C. confinis and increase leaf area of cabbage. Monocrop cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata) had the highest defoliation (p<0.05) and second highest abundance of C. confinis (p<0.05). These results shows that non-host plants can be incorporated into plant protection programs to ensure quality yield.

DOI: 10.33545/27080013.2021.v2.i1b.33

Pages: 95-101 | Views: 352 | Downloads: 163

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How to cite this article:
Kari Iamba, Tonavu Yaubi. Incorporating lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus L.) and marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) as non-host barrier plants to reduce impact of flea beetle (Chaetocnema confinis C.) in cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.). Acta Entomol Zool 2021;2(1):95-101. DOI: 10.33545/27080013.2021.v2.i1b.33


Acta Entomology and Zoology